Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Five Things I Dig About Jesus

I've been tagged by my new blogging friend, Alyce Lee. From what I can tell, here's how its supposed to work:

1. Those tagged will share five things they dig about Jesus.
2. Those tagged will tag five other bloggers.
3. Those tagged will provide a link in the comments section here of their meme so that others can read them.

So, here are five things I dig about Jesus:

1. Jesus let Mary sit at his feet while he taught his disciples and then explained to Martha that such a position was the best she could have chosen. In so doing, he affirmed the place of women as his disciples and elevated their status in the Kingdom.
2. Jesus taught 5,000 men, not counting women and children, but also cared enough for their physical bodies that he provided bread and fish for them as well.
3. Jesus wept over the death of his good friend Lazarus.
4. Jesus experienced the despair of abandonment by his Father on the cross and yet remained obedient, believing that he would be raised from the dead.
5. Jesus rules over every inch of the universe. There is not one atom to which he cannot point and say, "That's mine."

Now then, I tag the following bloggers:

1. Josh Carney
2. Joel Patrick
3. Big Daddy Weave
4. Peter Lumpkins
5. David (volfan007)

15 comments:

peter lumpkins said...

Dear Emily,

You are the one, you need to know, that pulled me out of hiding. I had been tagged twice before. Your email shamed me into it.

Grace. With that, I am...

Peter

p.s. I'll grab your site and stick it in my feeder to keep up with your posts.:^)

Emily Hunter McGowin said...

I'm glad I could dole out a good helping of shame to the unflappable Peter Lumpkins. :)

More than anything else, I was interested in what you would have to say. Plus, you seem like the type who wouldn't do something like that. I always appreciate a challenge.

Have a good evening,

Emily

Anonymous said...

Rex Ray said…
Emily,
You said, “Jesus wept over the death of his good friend Lazarus.”

If your friend, brother, mother, or father was in the grave, would you weep knowing you, with God’s power, was going to bring them to life, or would you be smiling ear to ear?
If it was me, I’d be so happy; I’d be floating on air. So why did Jesus weep?

(King James John 11: 33, 35, 38) “…he groaned in the spirit, and was troubled. Jesus wept. Jesus therefore again groaning in himself…”

(Holman) “He was angry in His spirit and deeply moved. Jesus wept. Then Jesus angry in Himself again…”

(Living) “He was moved with indignation and deeply troubled. Tears came to Jesus’ eyes. And again Jesus was moved with deep anger.”

(New Living) “A deep anger welled up within him, and he was deeply troubled. Then Jesus wept. Jesus was still angry as he arrived at the tomb.”

To know why Jesus wept, we must know why he was angry. I believe he was angry because after all the teaching and miracles he had done, the people, including the two sisters, still did not have faith in him.
If anything, I believe Jesus wept for himself. It was the closest he ever came to self-pity.

peter lumpkins said...

Dear Emily,

Poor, poor Jesus. I never thought of Him experiencing such self-pity as our Rex Ray seems to suggest. It kinda makes me feel sorry for Him.

Grace for the morn and faith this afternoon. With that, I am...

Peter

Emily Hunter McGowin said...

Rex Ray,

Thanks for your comment. I get where you're coming from, especially since Jesus' words at the tomb sound pretty angry: "Didn't I tell you that if you believed you would see the glory of God?" He sounds pretty fed up with the faithlessness of those around him.

In reality, my reason for including the fact that Jesus wept was that I'm a pretty big cry-baby in my private life. :) So, to know that Jesus cried, whether out of frustration, anger, sadness, whatever, encourages me. The Son of God knows what its like to have tears streaming down his face. He knows what its like to have puffy eyes and a runny nose from weeping. That's really cool to me.

Grace and peace,

Emily

Anonymous said...

Greetings from Hoptown -

I had never thought through the anger of Jesus at this time. We know He had planned for days to resurrect Lazarus, but the sisters (and certainly his disciples!) didn't show even the faith of Bartimaeus or other sick/birth-defected people in anticipating anything happening "on the spot." Had they (Martha?) talked each other out of expecting anything wonderful that day? Had Mary wanted to ask? Do we hear nothing else from them because they were ashamed of not asking for what Jesus was ready to do?

Should I be ashamed for not asking for what Jesus is ready to do in my life right now, while it's raining?

I suppose that I am agreeing with the scripture committees that he is angry because no one even shouted out to Him to restore Lazarus, or anticipated it in their hearts. (It's not like the Jordan baptism scene was recent! C'mon people - get a clue!)

Nothing even remotely resembling self-pity rings through for me here. Christ knew He had abundantly been Messiah to these people, and they had been trapped in their pre-formed hopes for another David, or perhaps Elijah or Uzziah. Hey, He's really "still in the village" where He could do nothing but heal a few.

I like your tag responses, by the way. Sorry so long -

Dona nobis pacem!

Steve Austin

Endlessly restless said...

Stumbled across your blog - strikes a chord with me.

Driving towork today it occurred to me that Jesus was pretty tough on those who 'should have known better', but more gently challenging to those who were struggling (like the woman caught in adultery or Zacchaeus). Cool - and somethingto live up to?!

Anonymous said...

Peter,
Someone said our purpose was to learn more of God so we could enjoy Him more throughout eternity.

“You have seen me, so you have seen the Father.” So the more we learn of Jesus, the more we learn of God. Emily has brought up 5 points about Jesus.

I think you and I are in the same boat if given a choice between praise and critical, we would chose critical. From previous comments I believe you thrive on irony. I find irony is dangerous on blogs as it may not be recognized.

With that said, what do you mean when you said:
1. “Poor poor Jesus…”?
2. What do you mean “…our Rex Ray”?
3. Why do you think Jesus wept?
4. Do you think his weeping was loud, or more like the Living Bible said…tears came to his eyes?
5. Do you think self pity is a sin?
6. Do you think because Jesus wept, God does also?
7. When we grieve the Holy Spirit, does He cry?

Emily Hunter McGowin said...

Steve and Endlessly Restless,

Welcome! Thanks for your comments and thoughtful questions. I thought the five "digs" about Jesus was a game, but I stand corrected. Of course stating the truth about Jesus isn't a game!

Grace and peace to all,

Emily

peter lumpkins said...

Dear Anon,

Thanks for the questions. Unfortunately, I make it a point not to answer an Anon. Sorry.

And as for my "thriving on irony," you are perfectly welcome to characterize my little footprints around Blogburg in such fashion. Be my guest.

Lord bless you, Anon. With that, I am...

Peter

Anonymous said...

Rex Ray said…
I’m sorry Peter that when I copy-pasted my comment I missed my name as only once in my ‘blogging’ have I have intentional omitted my name.

BTW, how can you bless someone after refusing to answer their questions, or is that more irony?

peter lumpkins said...

Dear Rex Ray,

That's perfectly alright, my Brother Rex Ray. I'm glad you understand about anons.

As for your pool of questions:

With that said, what do you mean when you said:
1. “Poor poor Jesus…”?

This was my attempt to post my contra-thought to your apparent seriousness about Jesus experiencing "self-pity"

2. What do you mean “…our Rex Ray”?

No more or less than similarly thanking *our* bloghost, Emily, for not kicking us off her thread for cluttering it up. Nothing evil I assure you.

3. Why do you think Jesus wept?

I do not think *our* Emily is off target when she assumes it's connected in some way with His good friend's death--and that, I realize, contra what you feel you would do in Jesus' sandals.

4. Do you think his weeping was loud, or more like the Living Bible said…tears came to his eyes?

I do not know.

5. Do you think self pity is a sin?

Sometimes, for sure it is.

6. Do you think because Jesus wept, God does also?

No. It does not follow because Jesus wept, God [the Father] also weeps.

7. When we grieve the Holy Spirit, does He cry?

I doubt it.

[8] BTW, how can you bless someone after refusing to answer their questions, or is that more irony?

No irony. Would you rather I curse them instead?

Grace, Rex Ray. With that, I am...

Peter

Anonymous said...

Rex Ray said…
Peter,
The best way to ‘bless’ someone on the blog is to give them a good honest reply to their comment and it can be agreeing or disagreeing.

And for that I thank you.

I think some go overboard on saying “Bless you.” It becomes ‘old hat’ and has lost its meaning.
In the first place for someone to give blessings, that someone has to be in position OVER the one being blessed.

I know there can be sincere feelings in using the words, but I believe a “thank you” is a better way to express one’s feelings.

When we were kids, how many times have we been angry about something and when we told ‘mama’, we’d bawl?

Once, Jesus was so angry he used a whip. This time, since Jesus was angry before and after he wept, I believe he was angry when he wept.

If we understand why Jesus wept, maybe his tears would touch our hearts more effective than a whip.

peter lumpkins said...

Dear Rex Ray,

I guess, my Brother, we will just disagree about the blessing. Nor do I for a moment believe one must positionally be *over* another in order to bless them.

Your original point--unless I missed it--was that Jesus was angry *because* others did not believe in Him and consequently, wept for Himself out of self-pity.

We could carry on further with this, but it probably has been squeezed enough. Suffice it, then, from my perspective, there is no reason to embrace otherwise than that, straightforwardly, Jesus wept for Lazarus for what sin's result had accomplished--separation...death.

Moreover, if Christ was angry here, it is not necessary that we interpret His anger to be thrust at His friend's disbelief, as you seem to note; rather His anger could just as well been toward death and the grave itself--"that through [His] death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil." If this is so, there is no basis for His suggested "self-pity."

Grace, Rex Ray. With that, I am...

Peter

Anonymous said...

Rex Ray said…
Peter, you said, “His anger could just as well been toward death and the grave itself--"that through [His] death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil. If this is so, there is no basis for His suggested "self-pity."

The power of death does not belong to the devil but to God. He pronounced death to Adam an Eve in the Garden. Jesus was not angry with his Father’s punishment upon man.

I’ve changed my mind about him having ‘self-pity’and you are right about that, but his tears were like Bennett Willis said today on Wade’s post, “If He [God] bothers to cry over us, I suspect they are tears of anger.”

Jesus was not sad about the death of Lazarus which he said would bring glory to his Father.

He was angry with the people for their unbelief.